Teaching Grandchildren How to Choose A Group of Friends

July 16, 2018 Published by
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Teaching Grandchildren How to Choose A Group of Friends

Every child wants to have friends and be part of a group.

With our guiding principles, we should play a role in educating our Grands on the principles of friendship, so they can choose the right friends and groups and avoid the fickle, fake, backstabbers and poor role models.

Teaching grandchildren through storytelling is my manner of imparting a message. I choose to tell my olive tree story by using the tree as a symbol and guide of what characteristics to look for in a group.

The Olive Tree Story

When I moved to California, dear Grands, I was aghast at the unattractiveness of the hundreds of olive trees lining the streets of Rancho Mirage. They were ugly and scary looking and their trunks looked as though they were a million years old.

Being a curious grandmother — I hope you will be curious, too —  I Googled the words “olive tree.” I wanted to learn about the tree before passing final judgment, something you should do when you choose a group of friends because the group will have a powerful influence on your attitude, reputation and the direction you take in your life.

I was in for a wonderful surprise, dear Grands. (See what happens when you are curious?) It turns out there was much more to the olive tree than one could see at first glance.

More About the Olive Tree

The olive tree is mentioned several times in the Bible. It was the first tree that sprouted up 7,000 years ago in the warm regions of the Old World, the Middle East, and its lifespan is 2,000 years.

Because of my research and curiosity, my viewpoint was changing.  I now saw the tree as ‘Godlike,’ even going so far as calling them ‘God’s first tree.’ I was having a 100% change of heart.

I continued reading and learned even more…

The olive tree became a ‘best friend’ to all in the Middle East because she was caring and giving. She became revered for bearing her olives for nourishment and sharing the oils in her olives to light the sacred lamps, as well as to be used in cooking, ointments and even skin products.

She shaded her people, during warm weather, with her outlay of branched leaves. Her trunk was used for wood making and building homes. She provided income for families from the sale of her olives and wood.

The ancient Greeks smeared the oil from the olive over their bodies for good health. The olive tree has a history of ‘sharing herself’ with the world. She is ‘beauty in the eye of the beholder’ because of her inner being.

The olive tree is mentioned more than 30 times in both the Old and New Testaments. It was the first tree native to the warm regions of the Old World where it first appeared 7,000 years ago! Its life spans over 2,000 years.

Teaching Grandchildren How to Choose A Group of Friends

I Did My Homework

I decided to learn about the tree, dear Grands. I did my homework.

To my amazement, I fell in love with the gnarled Biblical olive tree, so much in love that I planted one outside my doors leading from my little office, which I call ‘a room of my own.’

Every day I look at her, smile, and am happy.  When I see my olive tree each day I think of God. My tree has come to be majestically beautiful with her sturdy trunk. She has earned her place in my heart. She is my favorite tree!

This, dear Grands, is the message: Before you decide on joining a group, compare the people in the group to the Olive tree. Ability to share, be considerate, be helpful, be kind, and be productive are all values to look for before hitching your star to any friend or group.

Beauty Comes From Within

A tree does not have to be physically beautiful to be worthy. Beauty comes from within.

Compare people you know to the olive tree, as we know that beauty comes from within.

The olive tree shares her food, her oil, her wood and her leaves to shade others. She is not beautiful at first glance, but when you get to know her you realize she is a GIVING TREE. That is a value you look for in a friend!

Do something GOOD today:  Be an olive tree! Share your talents, your wisdom and your love for others.

I encourage you to share your thoughts with me via TwitterFacebookPinterest, Instagram or in the comments section below.

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P.S. Stay tuned for my book coming out in February. Here’s a hint: it’s all about being a grandmother and it’s all about you! More details to come soon.

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12 Comments

  • Madge says:

    dear honey,

    what do you think about my grandchildren befriending blacks?

    • Honey Good says:

      I think children should befriend blacks, Hispanic, Jew, Asian, Middle Eastern, etc…if they are people who appreciate your Grands. Warmly, Honey

  • Sharon says:

    This narrative will remain in my mind and heart … “a keeper!” Thank you Honey … I will miss you!

  • SoCal Allison says:

    I have found the warmest of welcomes from those other than me. Other races, other persuasions, other countries, other income levels, other whatevers! I think especially when you find yourself unexpectedly in another’s shoes, you see very easily how they fit — whether poorly, perfectly or just so-so. Those that shy away from others miss out on some wonderful relationships and friendships. And you never know when you will be blessed by receiving aid from others in your own time of need just as you may aid in theirs. Then all are angels, following the righteous path of goodness. An olive branch of friendship is greatly prized everywhere and throughout time immortal. Open your heart and open your mind and you’ll feel the wonder and love all around you. I know if I had not, I would not be where I am today in this moment. Friendship, like the olive tree by its very nature, is definitely a giving tree of life! I am definitely blessed by all my friendships.

  • Leslie says:

    Thank you for sharing your story of the olive trees! Really beautiful!

  • Pat says:

    Now I need to look at the book “The Giving Tree” when I get home. I read that to my children years ago, and now that I finally have my first grandchild, I know I will be reading it to him. Is this book really about the Olive Tree? I do not know…Now I am curious…

  • Camellia says:

    Wasn’t it the olive branch the white dove brought to Noah on the ark to show that there was land ahead. And it’s the olive branch used as the saying “ extending the olive branch “ to make amends with someone… “ ~~~

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