When did you first feel ‘old?’

October 20, 2017 Published by
Share on:

I pulled out an article from the Wall Street Journal my ultimate concierge saved for me. He thought it would make a good story. The article was titled, “When Did You First Feel Old.” You would think the article spoke to people over 50. Not so. Did you know there are people who feel old in their 30s? The article says that those three words pop up in everyone’s head beginning at a young age. I decided to write about the topic of age because I had an experience yesterday at Saks. A salesgirl made me feel old. I should have taken her words as a compliment.

I had run out of two Nars beauty products. Nars is sold at Saks so I ran over from my apartment. I asked for my two products and then sat down on a chair at the makeup counter to sample a new eyebrow color. The young woman helping me looked at me as she was applying color to my brows and said, “ I know you were a model.” I answered, “No, but thank you.” The thought that stuck in my mind was not her compliment but the word, “were.” I felt old. I thought about her words on my walk home.

When I left Saks my mood changed. I started walking down Michigan Ave. and it was a beautiful day. My spirits lifted and I felt young at heart. I remembered age was just a number. I decided I went negative on her positive compliment because of my recent surgery and a cold that was hanging on. I did not feel my normal self.

However, my conversation with the salesgirl and the Wall Street Journal article fueled today’s story. Everything is attitude, darlings. Everything.

Each day we have evolving thoughts and perceptions. Our minds are constantly churning out information. I have learned through my evolving thoughts that my mind and my body are intertwined and I have the ability to make positive choices. I know this because I feel it. The mind/body connection works in our favor if we use attitude to control our thinking. Think positive about your age and see your glass half full or think negative and see your glass half empty. It’s all about mind over matter, darlings. It is your beliefs. Your attitude.

The Wall Street Journal article talks about why a young man in his 30s felt old. He was placing his order at a Starbucks and was dismayed when the cashier called him “sir.” He recalled his parents using that term to address old people. On an upbeat note, the article discusses a woman, 101 years old, who still preaches at her church, who got her driver’s license at 96, who went to Africa at 97 and says her philosophy is, “People who spend their time ‘talking’ about being old and sick ‘feel’ old and sick.” A professor of psychology took a survey of 900 women between the ages of 18 and 87 and found that more than half of those women between the age of 18 and 29 were worrying about looking old!

On a positive note, Pew Research found over 65% of older women feel younger than their age. The gap becomes wider as we grow older. Half the women over 50 felt ten years younger. A third of the women 65-75 felt ten to nineteen years younger. We darlings, or most of us, are seeing our cup half full with positivity.

So, my darlings, remember more than 60% of your sisters are doing just fine with their age.

How do you see your glass?

Age is what we make it. I do see my glass half full because I enjoy filling my glass with positivity.

If you eat properly you put yourself on an emotional high even though you might be a half-empty type of gal. You are filling your glass with your positive actions. You are subscribing to good health practices which automatically makes you feel better. I eat pomegranate seeds, all berries, I drink green tea and take vitamin C, I eat fish (not sword or tuna) and orange vegetables.

Focus on filling your glass with opportunity. Do not sit back and dream. Move forward and DO. This definitely takes emotional energy.

Write down your personal 10 Commandments. Here are a few of mine:

  • I will be grateful for something(s) every day.
  • I will take the high road.
  • I will fill my glass half-full with total optimism.
  • I will live each day with purpose and passion.
  • My age is just a number.
  • I will give back.
  • I will be true to myself, feel my power.
  • I love and care deeply.

If you find yourself in a personal rut involve yourself with women who are vital, visible and believe in themselves. Move away from women who complain and live inside the box. You need stimulating women in your life.

Fortunately, you are or can be your own magic wand. Many of you do live magical lives. Share your ideas and identify them with me and your sisters; your attitudes and ideas for living a great life after the age of 50.

Share on:

Related Posts


24 Comments

  • Mon Cheri says:

    i know this to be true…i see it in my 78 year old mommy, who still rides the rapids and parasails! we don’t call her Grambo for nothing! oh, and your personal commandments? LOVE!

  • Patricia says:

    This is a very timely post for me. I am 60 and am really trying to take care of myself so that I can enjoy many more years of life with my family and grandchildren. And of course I want to be able to enjoy the things I love to do too. I recently met a woman who is new to my neighborhood and she seems nice. The problem is she is very negative about her age, and when I suggested we go on walks together, she said she doesn’t like walking anymore. I feel terrible about avoiding her but I just don’t want to have the negativity in my life. I don’t feel my age at all, and I love hiking and yoga. I do believe we must remain positive about ageing and take care of ourselves physically and spiritually.
    Thank you so much for lovely blog, each post is like a little treat that makes my day better!

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      Thank you for enjoying my musings. That makes me very happy. Secondly, this is not about you. This is about her. You cannot feel terrible. You invited her to partake in walks. She said no. See what I mean. Keep your routine.and do what makes you happy. Maybe you can do things together that are not’ physical activities’ if you decide you enjoy her company. Warmly, Honey

  • Mary says:

    Thank you! This is great. Love your list… note to self; pomegranate seeds! ????

  • Juju says:

    “Sir, is a sign of Respect, not age. Respect is what we need more of, at any age!
    Thanks for your thoughtful comments.

  • Cyndi Shooltz says:

    Dear Honey,
    I always look forward to your blog. This one is truly inspiring! I close every night to hour words. Thank you for your honest and insightful sharing.
    Cyndi

  • Lynda Beam says:

    I never felt old until my husband died, I was 60 and he was 48. I don’t always feel old (9 months later) but it literally aged me overnight.

  • Sandra says:

    This was inspirational, Honey. I only feel old when someone mentions my age…otherwise I don’t think about it!

    • Beverly Davenport says:

      Agree,I didn’t feel or think of age until my co worker announced my age and informed everyone of my age at work. I was devastated. I ask her why? She said no one thinks your that old, u look and act so young? I am 80, I was a teaching tennis pro. I now constantly think I should not do something because of my age…..This incident maybe aware that age is a state of mind if your healthy.

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      Good for you. Remember, age is just a number. Warmly, Honey

  • Janet says:

    I’m 64 and don’t feel old now. I’ve never felt invisible.
    George Strait sings it:I still feel 25 most of the time.

  • LuAnn says:

    I feel that I am so much younger than most people my age, 84 pushing 85, that I an thrilled with what ever my age is at the time. Honey, this post is one of your best. My cup is always at least half full. ????????????

  • Lisa Rubin says:

    Probably when people around me would call me ma’am instead of miss. It’s an eye-opener!

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      You are right. I agree with that term, too. That does not happen often though, Just enjoy each day. Warmly, Honey

  • Akaisha Kaderli says:

    I first felt old at 34. I was working 60-80 hours a week at our restaurant, and my personal sparkle had tarnished. I’m almost twice that age now, and I don’t feel old at all! ????????

  • Connie J. says:

    I am 72 years old and I can’t really grasp that I am this age! I have never felt old – well except for the time I had knee surgery and had to depend on my daughter to take care of me. But that didn’t last for long. My daughter, granddaughter and I just returned from a trip to NYC and we were on the go from 8 am until midnight or later for four days – I amazed myself!!! Ha!! I lost my husband when he 58 – I feel so fortunate to wake every morning and enjoy another beautiful day with my children and grandchildren!!

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      I was just in New York last week. I am truly happy for you.You sound jubilant. You are so happy because you are grateful Me, too. Warmly, Honey

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *