Meaningful Beauty

October 24, 2018 Published by
Share on:
Meaningful Beauty

By Karen Sands

The phrase “meaningful beauty” caught my eye recently. It’s appealing, isn’t it?

Who isn’t drawn by both beauty and meaning? The combination of the two was tantalizing, promising substance, a look at beauty that was beyond skin deep—which only made the actual content of the email all the more ironic.

So what did meaningful beauty really mean?

It was an ad for Cindy Crawford’s wrinkle-erasing skincare line.

Oh yeah, Cindy, you let me down big time. I may have done some angry typing for a while afterward. But I digress.

Now, I’m not going to pretend that I have always embraced the changes in my appearance as I entered midlife and beyond. Looking in the mirror and seeing those first fine lines, then the deepening of those lines into wrinkles, along with the sagging and other changes in my aging body was never easy. The person I saw in the mirror didn’t match how I felt inside. That isn’t me. And if that isn’t me, who am I?

Who am I if I’m no longer young?

And that gets to the heart of what the anti-aging industry, from skin creams to facelifts, is really promising. A reprieve from having to ask that frightening question. The chance to be who we think we are for just a little bit longer. To be noticed, relevant, visible.

Yet answering that question for ourselves, figuring out who we are when we’re no longer young, can be the most meaningful, liberating, and life-affirming step we ever take.

Nevertheless, are we brave enough to pursue that answer?

It can lead us to fulfilling our purpose on this planet, to awakening our visionary and creating the legacy we were always meant to create but couldn’t until we’d reached this point where experience, wisdom, and the search for meaning all coalesced. But we can’t create this future if we are focused on living in the past.

The anti-aging industry doesn’t offer meaningful beauty. It delays or even stops us from ever finding it. We all struggle with where to draw the line between enhancing our appearance and accepting ourselves as we are.

But let’s not pretend that we are going to find meaning in that jar of eye cream. The less time and energy we spend distracted by the promise of holding on to our youth, the more we can focus our time and energy on what really matters to us, from the people we love to the world. The more we make the effort to find actual meaningful beauty in ourselves, in who we are now, the closer we get to fulfilling our greatest vision yet.

After all, what kind of vision can we have if we don’t even see ourselves in the mirror clearly?

About the Author

This article was written by guest contributor Karen Sands. Karen is a blogger, journalist, and author. Her focus is on women like you, or as she says, the “ageless generation.” Check out her website for more articles. You can also follow her on FacebookTwitter, and Pinterest.

Share on:

Related Posts


6 Comments

  • Mary Jane says:

    It is strange to look in the mirror and see ourselves in a new light. Our beauty is really on the inside! And that always makes us beautiful no matter how many wrinkles, sagging, or gray hair we may have. 😘

  • Elizabeth Sheffer -Winig says:

    Honey, I agree with you 100%. I look in the mirror and see two things – one is my mother staring back at me, and the other is a vibrant 66 year old who has embraced her lines and sags and will be embracing her grey hair as I work with my stylist to go au natural. I love your blog and look forward to reading it daily. Keep up the sisterhood as we need togetherness in these troubled times. Sending you love and keeping your beautiful granddaughter in my prayers and the whole family.

  • Candy says:

    Actually, this was a good article I am in the skincare industry but I use natural products and stay away from fillers. I would love to write an article on Menopase

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      Please feel free to send an article to ed@honeygood.com. Explain that you read my stories and would like to submit an article on Menopause along with the article. You will hear back from Carolyn, my editor. Warmly, Honey

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *