How do anti-aging beauty devices work?

January 17, 2018 Published by
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How do anti-aging beauty devices work?

Walking through the cosmetics section of a department store or even your favorite cosmetics store you could feel more like you’re about to buy an electronic device than a new foundation. Beauty devices aren’t new, but it seems there are more on the market now than ever and it can be so confusing! What do they all do?! On top of it, a lot of them are really expensive! So if you’re going to buy something you should know how the basics work. Well, darlings, I needed to get to the bottom of this! And specifically, I wanted to know how they can help us older women combat some of the less flattering signs of aging. So here are some categories of beauty devices on the market that help some of our aging woes.

Cellulite smoother

For most women, cellulite appears long before middle age but can get worse. At-home devices labeled to help treat cellulite really offer deep tissue massages. Cellulite never actually goes away and it turns out even medical treatments for cellulite are very hit or miss. However, there are products on the market that offer deep tissue massages that redistribute the liquid deposits that cause the dimpling of cellulite.  One such product is the Riiviva Cellulite( Buy it here: $129 at Riiviva) which got a very positive review from Allure after just a few uses.

Riiviva

Devices for cleansing

If washing your face seemed important when you were just a teenager combating acne it is just as important now that we are older. I’ve already written about how important it is for older women to use a makeup remover( read that story here) but that’s not enough. There are devices on the market right now that aid in the deep cleaning of your face. A popular cleansing brush, which is made of silicon and thus according to them never needs to be replaced, is produced in powered and unpowered versions by Foreo. If you want a more traditional brush you can try the Clinique Sonic System Purifying Cleansing Brush which was designed to be used intuitively based on how most women already wash their face. Both devices are meant to offer deep cleans.

Left: Clinique Sonic System Purifying Cleansing Brush – Buy it here: $89.50 from Nordstrom
Center:  Foreo Luna Play – Buy it here: $49 at Revolve
Right: Foreo Luna 2 Mini – Buy it here:  $139 at Revolve

Microneedling

If you have a fear of needles( even tiny ones) I suggest you skip this section. Microneedling used to be an in-office procedure, but now it is one that has devices you can use at home. Some are rollers and some are pens, but all the devices have tiny needles that cause tiny injuries, totally invisible injuries, to your skin which triggers your body’s natural healing process and collagen production. Microneedling is proven to reduce fine lines and wrinkles.

Left: ORA Electric Microneedle Derma Pen System – Buy it here: $82 from Dermstore
Center:  Beauty Bioscience GloPRO® Microneedling Regeneration Tool – Buy it here: $199 from Bergdorf Goodman
Right: ORA Microneedle Face Roller System 2 Mini – Buy it here: $20 from Dermstore

LED lights

Many anti-aging beauty devices also utilize light therapy. Much like microneedling, the lights are supposed to jumpstart the body’s own collagen production to help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

Left: NuFACE Women’s NuFACE Trinity Facial Trainer Kit with Trinity Wrinkle Reducer – Buy it here: $429 from Barneys New York
Center: SkinClinical Reverse Anti-Aging Red Light Therapy Device – Buy it here: $199 from QVC
Right: Baby Quasar Quasar Pure Rayz Anti-Aging Red Light Therapy Device – Buy it here: $199 from Kohl’s

So there you have it, a quick primer on what just a few of these devices do. What do you think? Have you tried any at-home beauty devices? What were your results? Let us know in the comments or join in the conversation on Facebook.

This post features affiliate links. Purchases made off of this post benefit GrammaGood, LLC.

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5 Comments

  • Dawn says:

    This is not a primer on what they DO. It is what they promise to do, not what they necessarily accomplish.

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      Hello Dawn, The goal of the article was to explain the anti-aging principles behind the devices. I’m sorry if you found it misleading that was obviously not the intent. Have a wonderful day!

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      I agree. I noticed so many of these products in the marketplace, I wanted to expose my readers to what’s out there so they could decide. Warmly, Honey

  • Linda says:

    This doesn’t really tell us anything about the effectiveness of these products. I found it a very misleading article. A shame, as I enjoy so many if Honey’s posts.

    • Susan "Honey" Good says:

      Hello Linda, The goal was just to explain some of the techniques behind the devices. I’m sorry you found it misleading as I always strive to be informative.

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